Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

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2020 Scholastic Art & Writing winners for The Herblock Award for Editorial Cartooning

Scholastic Announcement of Top Honors in the 2020 Scholastic Arts & Writing Awards

YARLHIN LOPEZ
YARLHIN LOPEZ, Another Regular School Day, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 12, High School of Art & Design, New York, NY. Gold Medal, Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.

GINA BAE
GINA BAE, Hong Kong's Fight for Free Press, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 10, Palo Alto High School, Palo Alto, CA. Gold Medal, Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.

STEVE DOU
STEVE DOU, Backstabbing Our Liberty, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 11, Lynbrook High School, San Jose, CA. Gold Medal, Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.


2019 Scholastic Art & Writing winners for The Herblock Award for Editorial Cartooning

VICTORIA LU
VICTORIA LU, How Milk is Made, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 11, Age 16, South Side High School, South Hempstead, NY. 2019 Gold Medal and Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.

"I cannot express the extent of my gratitude for your support. As a young artist and activist, it has always been important to communicate issues I care about through my work. The piece I submitted to Scholastic was about the dairy industry, but there are numerous other problems such as whaling, animal cruelty, and of course, climate change. As a child, I spent a lot of time digging in the backyard, exploring the mountains of my mother’s Chinese hometown, or collecting samples to build terrariums. These experiences heavily inspired my beliefs today. I want to keep using my voice to spread awareness and change. The Herblock Foundation Award acknowledged me, gave me a platform to express myself, and encouraged me to continue working for a better worldI cannot express the extent of my gratitude for your support. As a young artist and activist, it has always been important to communicate issues I care about through my work. The piece I submitted to Scholastic was about the dairy industry, but there are numerous other problems such as whaling, animal cruelty, and of course, climate change. As a child, I spent a lot of time digging in the backyard, exploring the mountains of my mother’s Chinese hometown, or collecting samples to build terrariums. These experiences heavily inspired my beliefs today. I want to keep using my voice to spread awareness and change. The Herblock Foundation Award acknowledged me, gave me a platform to express myself, and encouraged me to continue working for a better world."  --- Victoria Lu, 2019 winner

ZITONG WANG
ZITONG WANG, Diversity Discussion, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 11, Age 16, Mercer Island High School, Mercer Island, WA. 2019 Gold Medal and Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.

"Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to receive the Herblock Award! Editorial cartoons express with not words but with art, making it a very powerful way to bring awareness to the issues we want to voice. I have always found editorial cartoons the most insightful and entertaining, whether it is the cartoon section in the newspaper or on the internet. Your gift and support have been my biggest encouragements and motivators, prompting me to explore editorial cartooning as one of my main focuses in art. While many people have seen and appreciated editorial cartoons, fewer people are creating art in this form. I am truly honored to have delved into making editorial cartoons, and I would like to thank you on the behalf of all teens for showing us the importance, influence, and impact of this special and creative form of art. I know I will create art for the rest of my life, sharing my opinions and emotions just as Scholastic and the Herb Block Foundation helped me do this year. I cannot thank you enough for this amazing experience and honor."  ---Zitong Wang, 2019 winner

ANGELA YU
ANGELA YU, Keep It Down, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 10, Age 15, Morris County School of Technology, Cedar Knolls, NJ. 2019 Gold Medal and Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon.


2018 Scholastic Art & Writing winners for The Herblock Award for Editorial Cartooning

2018 Scholastic Gutierrez Javier - Wish You Were Here
JAVIER GUTIERREZ, Wish You Were Here!, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 12, Age 18, Reavis High School, Burbank, IL. 2018 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, Gold Medal.

2018 Scholastic Han Joy - Women of Comfort
JOY HAN, Women of Comfort, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 10, Age 15, Crescent Valley High School, Corvallis, OR. 2018 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, Gold Medal.

2018 Scholastic Li Brandon - Concession.png
BRANDON LI, Concession, Editorial Cartoon sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation. Grade 11, Age 16 Home School, Skillman, NJ. 2018 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, Gold Medal.


2017 Winners for The Herblock Award for Editorial Cartooning 

2017 scholastic winner Slippery Slope.jpg
2017 Scholastic winner What Remains.jpg
 

Slippery Slope by Gabriel Chez (on left), Grade 11, Age 17, Design & Architecture Senior High School Miami, FL.
What Remains by Gillian Maurer (on right), Grade 12, Age 19, Asheville High School, Asheville, NC.>

 

Please view Sail by Patricia Patalinjug's beautiful animated submission, Grade 10, Age 15, Nutley High School Nutley, NJ


Look at the first winners of The Herblock Award for Editorial Cartooning through the Scholastic Arts & Writing Awards 2016

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Say Cheese, Editorial Cartoon by Kaitlyn Quatch, Grade 10, Age 15, Fiorello H. Laguardia High School of Music, New York, NY

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Thank you letter, December 2016

Dear Herb Block Foundation,

            Considering that this is the first scholarship I have ever won, I am deeply influenced by the experience. I am genuinely thankful for the opportunity that you have made available through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards and to many other aspiring cartoonists like me. I realized that the point of art, in my opinion, is not to be merely aesthetically pleasing but to make people think, really think, about what the piece represents. Art is supposed to stimulate the mind, to influence people, to make them question. And what’s a better way to do it than through political cartoons? Not only do they wittily depict a specific point of view, people can get a chuckle out of them too!

            When I was in eighth grade I was faced with an extremely difficult choice; I was accepted into both a high school specializing in art and a high school with a good computer science program. My family pushed me toward the STEM school. It’s harder to make a living as an artist, they told me -- and logic was on their side. But my heart pulled me elsewhere, and in a single impulsive move I bubbled in LaGuardia High School on my application. However, once I went, I discovered that all the other art majors were just as good as I was, and many were even better. A staple was at least one art scholarship or award (plus the envious chatter of others). I felt nervous because no one gawked at my sketchbook, no one complimented me, and I had no awards or anything to prove my skill. Was I good enough to snatch a career in this super competitive field? Could I be good enough? These questions lurked in the back of my head all throughout freshman and sophomore year. I was becoming unsure of my hasty move.

In 2014 I tried entering the art contest everyone was talking about -- the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. I submitted a short comic -- late -- and somehow earned an Honorable Mention. It was enough to encourage me to enter again the next year, and that’s when I spotted your new category. I had recently learned about the Syrian refugee crisis and had super strong feelings about it, so I decided to give political cartooning a shot. Lo and behold, I won not only a National Gold Medal but your scholarship as well. Still no one gawks at my sketchbook. Still no one compliments me. But now I know that I have the potential to influence the world with my art one day. And again, I give you my sincerest thanks.

Yours truly,

Kaitlyn Quach

2016 Herblock Award for Editorial Cartoon

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Another Day at the Office, Editorial Cartoon by Ryan Sunada-Wong, Grade 10, Age 15, Millburn High School, Millburn, NJ

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Random Objects That Visualize the Chinese American Experience, Editorial Cartoon by Sherrill Zheng, Grade 12, Age 18, Perpich Center for Arts Education, Golden Valley, MN


Editorial Cartoon Category Sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation Invites Students in Grades 7–12 to Submit Their Original Work

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers has announced the addition of a new “editorial cartoon” category to the 93rd annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, the country's longest-running and most prestigious scholarship and recognition program for creative teens. Sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation, the Editorial Cartoon category celebrates the legacy of four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist Herb Block and his remarkable contribution to American history and free expression. Three teen artists will be selected to each receive a $1,000 scholarship from The Herb Block Foundation for their outstanding drawings, illustrations, or animated short films offering commentary on current events or political topics.

“Cultural and artistic trends have driven the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards categories over the years,” said Virginia McEnerney, Executive Director of the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. “Recent submissions have shown that teen interest in political issues is burgeoning, particularly as the presidential election nears. Adding Editorial Cartoons to the Scholastic Awards is an exciting opportunity to increase awareness of the art form among teens, preserve Herb Block’s amazing legacy, and underscore the importance of free expression in a democratic society. We are thrilled to be working with the wonderful people at The Herb Block Foundation to bring this to life.”

Jean J. Rickard, Founding Executive Director of The Herb Block Foundation, said, "Since the first board meeting, the Foundation has sought to encourage the next generation of editorial cartoonists. We are excited to collaborate in this partnership and see the creativity and future of the art form."

Beginning September 16, 2015 students in grades 7–12 can submit original art and writing works to the 2016 Awards. For the Editorial Cartoon category, single-panel drawings with captions, sequential comic art, illustrations, digitally created drawings, or animated films with a political theme or message will be considered. This new addition joins the program’s existing 28 categories, ranging from painting to photography, flash fiction to poetry, and even video game design. Submissions to the Awards are first judged on a regional level by more than 100 Regional Affiliates of the Alliance, who bring the program to life in local communities. Top regional submissions are then evaluated nationally by a panel of creative-industry experts including Andres Serrano, Edwidge Danticat, Julie Mehretu, Roz Chast, and Stephen Savage, who have all served as past jurors.

The talented students who receive Scholastic Art & Writing Awards gain access to exhibition and publication opportunities. More than 60 partner colleges and universities set aside $10 million in scholarships for high school seniors who receive Scholastic Awards. These exceptional students walk in the footsteps of celebrated alumni of the program such as Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, Sylvia Plath, Robert Redford, Stephen King, Myla Goldberg, Richard Linklater, Kay WalkingStick, Zac Posen and Lena Dunham, all of whom received Awards when they were teens.

Submissions open in September and deadlines vary by region throughout the winter months. To learn more about the Awards, visit the Scholastic Media Room online at mediaroom.scholastic.com/artandwriting.


About the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers:

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, identifies teenagers with exceptional creative talent and brings their remarkable work to a national audience through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Founded in 1923, the Awards program is the longest-running, most prestigious initiative of its kind, having fostered the creativity and talent of millions of students through recognition, exhibition, publication, and scholarships. Over the past six years alone, students have submitted more than a million works of art and writing and more than $30 million has been made available in scholarships and awards to top participants. www.artandwriting.org