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Herblock Gallery at Library of Congress

HERBLOCK AT HALF-CENTURY: Library of Congress show illuminates cartoonist's brillance in 1963 - by Michael Cavna (Comic Riffs in The Washington Post, 5/21/2013)

 

Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC   20540

February 26, 2013

 “Herblock Looks at 1963” Exhibition Opens March 30, 2013

In 1963, during the third and final year of his presidency, John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) faced repeated opposition to legislative initiatives—the nuclear test ban treaty with the Soviet Union, tax cuts to reduce economic stagnation, efforts to increase resources for schoolchildren and protection of the wilderness.  Also in 1963, through the “March on Washington” on Aug. 28, the civil rights movement gained momentum.

Herblock, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Washington Post, addressed all these topics.  His drawings will be on view in the exhibition “Herblock Looks at 1963: Fifty Years Ago in Editorial Cartoons,” opening Saturday, March 30, 2013, at the Library of Congress in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

The 10-cartoon exhibition, which runs through Sept. 14, 2013, is free and open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

 The exhibition is located in the Herblock Gallery, part of the Graphic Arts Galleries, which celebrates the work of Herbert L. Block with rotating displays of 10 original drawings.  The display changes every six months.  A second set of drawings from 1963 will be placed on exhibition from Sept. 21, 2013 to March 22, 2014.

 Cartoons on view will include “We Can’t Burden Our Children with Deficit Spending,” which Herblock created to challenge Congress not to cut funding for education, because the result would be ignorance, poverty and crime.  Also on view will be “Reminds Me of That Crazy Idea of Henry Ford’s That You Can Make More Selling at Lower Prices,” which depicts legislators as old-fashioned businessmen out of step with the times.  Herblock penned the drawing in response to Republican congressmen who challenged Kennedy to reduce spending rather than cut taxes to spur productivity.

 Herblock actively promoted civil rights for African Americans during the 1960s.  On Aug. 28, 1963, the cartoonist sat in the press tent as the crowd grew around him for the “March on Washington.”  His support is evident in the drawing “Conceived in Liberty and Dedicated to The Proposition That All Men Are Created Equal.”

 Herblock was a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize.  He spent more than 55 years at the Washington Post, taking on political corruption wherever he saw it and championing the rights of “the little guy.” 

 The Herb Block Foundation donated a collection of more than 14,000 original cartoon drawings and 50,000 rough sketches, as well as manuscripts, to the Library of Congress in 2002, and has generously continued to provide funds to support ongoing programming.

 

The Library has been collecting original cartoon art for more than 140 years.  It is a major center for cartoon research with holdings of more than 100,000 original cartoon drawings and prints. These works, housed in the Prints and Photographs Division, span five centuries and range from 17th-century Dutch political prints to 21st-century contemporary comic strips.

 The Prints and Photographs Division holds the largest-known collection of American political prints, the finest assemblage of British satirical prints outside Great Britain and holdings of original drawings by generations of America’s best cartoonists and illustrators that are unequaled in breadth and depth.  Extensive runs of rare satirical and comic journals from Europe and the United States represent another distinguishing facet. The Library acquired these materials through a variety of sources including artists’ gifts, donations by private collectors, selective purchases and copyright registration.

 For sample images from “Herblock Looks at 1963,” contact Donna Urschel at (202) 707-1639.

Public contact: Sara Duke (202) 707-3630; sduk@loc.gov

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August 20, 2012

“Down to Earth: Herblock and Photographers Observe the Environment”

Opens at Library of Congress on Sept. 22

Throughout his 72-year career, Herblock, the award-winning cartoonist at the Washington Post, revealed a concern and passion for the environment.  His cartoons, along with photographs on environmental issues by 12 American photographers, will be showcased in a new exhibition at the Library of Congress.

“Down to Earth: Herblock and Photographers Observe the Environment” opens on Saturday, Sept. 22 in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground level of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  Free and open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, the exhibition closes on Saturday, March 23, 2013.

The exhibition will offer new perspectives with which to observe the planet.  The cartoons and photographs on display are compelling compositions, because their creators intended to provoke reaction and inspire change.

The inspiration for “Down to Earth” comes from Herbert L. Block (1909-2001), commonly called Herblock, and his long-standing support for protecting the environment.  A four-time Pulitzer Prize winner, Herblock was the chief editorial cartoonist at the Washington Post, where he worked for more than 55 years.

The exhibition features 15 Herblock cartoons and 17 photographs.  Although the visual techniques used in photography and cartooning differ, both types of media can address such themes as the spread of toxins, water pollution, the negative effects of oil drilling, global warming, deforestation, exploitation of wetlands and overconsumption.

Sam Kittner’s photographs vividly document the outrage of demonstrators in Louisiana over toxic-waste dumping.  Other images are more subtle, such as Olaf Otto Becker’s beautiful image of a blue river in Greenland that shows the effects of global warming and acid rain.

Herblock’s cartoons rely on humor, irony and sarcasm.  One of the drawings on display, from 2001, shows two businessmen smoking cigars and looking at oil derricks on the Alaskan landscape.  It is titled “We Could Compromise and Paint Them Green.”  Another drawing, created in 1998, shows a beleaguered man, seen through the heat waves of a blazing sun.  He is carrying a coat on one arm and is holding up a newspaper with the headline “Environmental Groups Warn of Global Warming.”  It is titled “All Right, All Right – I Believe It.”

An online version of “Down to Earth” will be available on Saturday, Sept. 22, at http://myloc.gov/Exhibitions/herblock-down-to-earth/.

“Down to Earth” is located in one of the three exhibition spaces of the Graphic Arts Galleries.  The other spaces are the Swann Gallery and the Herblock Gallery.  Three gallery talks about “Down to Earth” are scheduled in October.  At noon on Wednesday, Oct. 3, and at noon on Wednesday, Oct. 17, curators Sara Duke and Carol Johnson will talk about the works featured in the exhibition.  At noon on Thursday, Oct. 11, photographer Robert Coppola will talk about his work.

Most of the photographs displayed in “Down to Earth” are part of the Kent and Marcia Minichiello Collection at the Library of Congress, which contains 350 contemporary works by more than 20 American photographers.  The collection presents ongoing environmental issues through the lens of some of the most renowned American photographers working today, such as Terry Evans, Frank Golhke, Sam Kittner, John Pfahl and Victor Landweber.  Kent and Marcia Minichiello, Washingtonians committed to the environment, collected 27 in-depth photographic projects by these photographers and others.  The Minichiellos donated the collection to the Library in 2001.

The Herb Block Foundation donated a collection of more than 14,000 original cartoon drawings and 50,000 rough sketches, as well as manuscripts, to the Library of Congress in 2002, and has generously continued to provide funds to support ongoing programming.

The Library has been collecting original cartoon art for more than 140 years.  It is a major center for cartoon research with holdings of more than 100,000 original cartoon drawings and prints. These works, housed in the Prints and Photographs Division, span five centuries and range from 17th-century Dutch political prints to 21st-century contemporary comic strips.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division includes approximately 14.4 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history.  For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/.

For sample images from “Down to Earth,” contact Donna Urschel at (202) 707-1639.

Herblock Gallery Themes: http://myloc.gov/exhibitions/herblockgallery/pages/themes.aspx

 September 7, 2012

Press contact:  Donna Urschel (202) 707-1639, durschel@loc.gov
Public contact:  Sara Duke (202) 707-3630, sduk@loc.gov

 “Herblock Looks at 1962” Exhibition Opens March 20, 2012

John F. Kennedy in 1962, the second year of his U.S. presidency, attempted to implement new policies that met with partisan opposition: assisting the unemployed, passing a jobs bill and creating Medicare.  Abroad, he increased military presence in Vietnam and faced the Soviet Union in a nuclear showdown known as the “Cuban Missile Crisis.”

These issues provided rich material for Washington Post editorial cartoonist Herbert L. Block—better known as “Herblock.”  By 1962, Herblock, who could artfully and effectively wield his pen, had won two Pulitzer Prizes.

His drawings will be on view in the exhibition “Herblock Looks at 1962: Fifty Years Ago Today in Editorial Cartoons,” opening March 20, 2012, at the Library of Congress in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

The exhibition, which runs through Sept. 5, 2012, is free and open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday.  It will be held in the Herblock Gallery, part of the Graphic Arts Galleries, which celebrates the work of Herblock with an ongoing display of 10 original drawings.  The display changes every six months.

In 1945, Herblock developed his character “Mr. Atom” to personify the threat of nuclear annihilation that was ever-present during the Cold War (1945-1990).  In 1962, Herblock used Mr. Atom repeatedly, when Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev challenged Kennedy.  The confrontation played out over the placement of nuclear missiles in Cuba and Turkey.  At the same time, disarmament talks in Geneva, Switzerland, did not go well and the “Doomsday Clock” ticked closer to midnight, signaling the increased likelihood of nuclear war.

Ten cartoons will be on view, including “Tick—Tock—Tick,” “Once More unto the Brink, Once More,” “I May Still Have to Rely on Reckless Inaction” and “Hello—ORwell 1984?”

Herblock was a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize.  He spent more than 55 years at the Washington Post, taking on political corruption wherever he saw it and championing the rights of “the little guy.” 

The Herb Block Foundation donated a collection of more than 14,000 original cartoon drawings and 50,000 rough sketches, as well as manuscripts, to the Library of Congress in 2002, and has generously continued to provide funds to support ongoing programming.

The Library has been collecting original cartoon art for more than 140 years.  It is a major center for cartoon research with holdings of more than 100,000 original cartoon drawings and prints. These works, housed in the Prints and Photographs Division, span five centuries and range from 17th-century Dutch political prints to 21st-century contemporary comic strips.

The Prints and Photographs Division holds the largest-known collection of American political prints, the finest assemblage of British satirical prints outside Great Britain and holdings of original drawings by generations of America’s best cartoonists and illustrators that are unequaled in breadth and depth.  Extensive runs of rare satirical and comic journals from Europe and the United States represent another distinguishing facet. The Library acquired these materials through a variety of sources including artists’ gifts, donations by private collectors, selective purchases and copyright registration.

For sample images from “Herblock Looks at 1962,” contact Donna Urschel at (202) 707-1639.

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PR12-33
2/7/12
ISSN:  0731-3527

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Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC   20540

March 17, 2011

Press contact:  Donna Urschel (202) 707-1639, durschel@loc.gov
Public contact:  Sara Duke (202) 707-3630, sduk@loc.gov
                             Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

Graphic Arts Galleries at Library of Congress Open on March 18   

HERBLOCK GALLERY                         

The Library of Congress announces the opening of the Swann Gallery and the Herblock Gallery on Friday, March 18, 2011.  The galleries are two of three exhibition spaces located within the new Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground level of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building. 

The third exhibition space in the Graphic Arts Galleries will open in September 2011.  The galleries will focus on the Library’s cartoon collections and offer visitors a rich sampling of caricatures, comic strips, political drawings, artwork created for magazines and graphic-novel illustrations.

The galleries will be open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and admission is free.

The Herblock Gallery celebrates the work of editorial cartoonist Herbert L. Block—better known as “Herblock”— with an ongoing display of 10 original drawings, to change every six months.  A four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, who spent more than 55 years at the Washington Post, Herblock took on political corruption wherever he saw it, and championed the rights of  “the little guy.”  The inaugural exhibition, “Herblock Looks at Communism,” presents a selection of his 1951 cartoons about the Korean War.  A new display in September will explore the Khrushchev-Kennedy confrontation in 1961.  The Herb Block Foundation donated the collection of more than 14,000 original cartoon drawings and 50,000 rough sketches, as well as manuscripts, to the Library of Congress in 2002, and has generously continued to provide funds to support ongoing programming.

The Swann Gallery introduces visitors to the fascinating world of caricatures, political cartoons, comics, animation art, graphic novels and illustrations.  A permanent memorial exhibition will feature 15 facsimiles of treasured cartoons from the Swann and other cartoon collections, which represent the broad range of holdings in the Library of Congress.  This exhibition is made possible by the Swann Foundation, which was established by Erwin Swann (1906–1973) in 1967 to support ongoing exhibitions, related programming, preservation and development of collections and to encourage appreciation for the dynamic, evolving field of cartoon and illustration arts.

In September 2011, the third gallery will open with a changing-exhibition program that showcases the graphic arts collections in the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress.  Its inaugural exhibition will be “Timely and Timeless: New Comic Art Acquisitions,” featuring treasures of original cartoon art that were added to the Library’s collections during the past decade.  On display will be political commentaries, comic-strip and comic-book drawings, New Yorker magazine illustrations and examples of graphic narratives.

The Library has a long history of exhibiting cartoon and caricature art, with the first Swann Gallery—known as the Oval Gallery—opening in 1982 in the James Madison Building.  The Swann Gallery moved to the Thomas Jefferson Building in 1998 and remained open until 2004, when preparations started for construction of the Library’s tunnel to the Capitol Visitors Center.  In subsequent years, large-scale cartoon art exhibitions—“Humor's Edge: Cartoons by Ann Telnaes” (2004); “Enduring Outrage: Editorial Cartoons by Herblock” (2006); “Cartoon America” (2006); and “Herblock!” (2009)—were held in various exhibition spaces in the Jefferson Building.

The Library has been collecting original cartoon art for more than 140 years.  It is a major center for cartoon research with holdings of more than 100,000 original cartoon drawings and prints. These works, housed in the Prints and Photographs Division, span five centuries and range from 17th-century Dutch political prints to 21st-century contemporary comic strips.

The Prints and Photographs Division holds the largest-known collection of American political prints, the finest assemblage of British satirical prints outside Great Britain and holdings of original drawings by generations of America’s best cartoonists and illustrators that are unequaled in breadth and depth.  Extensive runs of rare satirical and comic journals from Europe and the United States represent another distinguishing facet. The Library acquired these materials through a variety of sources including artists’ gifts, donations by private collectors, selective purchases and copyright registration.

Sample images from the Swann Gallery:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/91705247/
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008661676/
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/96508418/

For sample images from the Herblock Gallery, contact Donna Urschel at (202) 707-1639.